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My abuser Ben Yallop - a determined manipulator. Well protected. He works for the Lord Chief Justice, Sir Ian Burnett.

One vital 'thing to do' before you retire Sir Ian:

Sack my abusers, Alice Rose and Ben Yallop. Ask Mr Yallop to hand on my several letters to you. Even the Essex Police wonder why he is not giving you my letters, all addressed to you. Report Alice Rose to the Met Police.


Lord chief justice announces his retirement

The lord chief justice of England and Wales has announced plans to step down after a recent record in post.

In a statement this morning, HM Judiciary said The Rt Hon. The Lord Burnett of Maldon will retire as lord chief justice on 30 September 2023 after being appointed to the role in October 2017. By his retirement, he will have completed six years in office, more than any other since Lord Lane, who served as lord chief justice from 1980 to 1992.

In a statement, Burnett said: ‘It has been a great privilege to serve as lord chief justice. I have been honoured to lead a wholly independent judiciary dedicated to the rule of law, the administration of justice and public service which confidently celebrates its traditions yet has quietly assimilated very many modern working practices.

Lord Burnett: ‘Much to do before I leave office’
Source: Alamy

‘We have transformed judicial welfare and education and introduced professional support which was lacking in the old arrangements inherited from the Lord Chancellor’s Department by the judicial office. We have become much more active in local communities and schools and have a diversity and inclusion strategy which will continue to deliver results.’

He added: ‘We persuaded successive lord chancellors and government that the technical changes made to judicial pensions had produced the adverse effects on recruitment predicted by my predecessors.

‘By mid-2019 the need for change had been accepted and the resulting legislation finally received Royal Assent earlier this year. There remain difficulties in recruiting to some judicial offices which is the subject of ongoing work.

’There is much to do before I leave office. I shall continue to work constructively with all those whose contributions are vital to the administration of justice. I look forward to continuing to provide service after I leave this role working at a less frenetic pace.’

The lord chief justice’s successor will be announced next summer.

By Bianca Castro
24 November 2022
The Law Society Gazette
Original article HERE


Sir Ian. Change the Judicial Conduct Rules, as requested by Lord Pickles, to make it an offence of misconduct for judges like Sharp J and Popplewell L J refusing in 2011 and 2021 respectively to condemn me being told, at the behest of a High Court defendant, to 'Go fuck Allah, the Camel' and told 'Going to fuck your mother. She like white man.' and all the others, declared a hate-crime by the Essex Police and referred to Interpol.

Rude judge? Don't just shrug your shoulders, says LCJ

Lawyers should raise complaints about a rude judge at an early stage rather than let the problem grow and fester, the lord chief justice has told the Bar Council's flagship conference.

Lord Burnett of Maldon said judges will shortly be issued with a ‘statement of behaviour’ – something he revealed to the justice committee this month - on how to behave with judicial colleagues, court staff and those who appear before them.

Pausing for questions, Bar Council chair Mark Fenhalls KC asked how barristers should approach situations where they believe a judge has stepped out of line. Should they, for instance, approach their head of chambers or speak to the circuit leader?

Lord Burnett replied that there had always been difficult opponents and judges. ‘Tolerance for rudeness has just become less over the years. And the approach you and I experienced when we started at the bar, with a shrug of the shoulders and moving on, is no longer appropriate.’

Lord Burnett of Maldon: 'Statement of behaviour' will shortly be issued to judges
Source: Alamy

There are many different ways of dealing with inappropriate behaviour, Lord Burnett said, but it depended on how bad someone perceives the behaviour to be and the personal feelings of the person unhappy about the behaviour.

‘If it is a one-off thing, most people would want to deal with it informally. If that’s what they wanted to do, there are many ways of raising it informally. Within the judiciary itself there is a grievance procedure which also involves staff, which may be appropriate in some cases. If the person concerned about it feels the behaviour is very, very bad, there is a judicial complaints system.’

Lord Burnett acknowledged that lawyers might be concerned that making a complaint might be held against them. ‘That’s simply not so. It is much better to deal with the problem at an early stage rather than let them grow and fester.’

The statement of behaviour will be a ‘short kicking-off point’, he said. ‘Training and dissemination of good behaviour, and the need for there to be constant discussion about this, is to try and mitigate it and minimise it.’

However, ‘just as advocates are often under a great deal of pressure and sometimes say and do things in hindsight they would bitterly regret, so too judges are under a great deal of pressure and things are said and done which should not be', Lord Burnett said - but he stressed that inappropriate behaviour must be dealt with and should not be tolerated.

By Monidipa Fouzder
24 November 2022
The Law Society Gazette
Original Article HERE

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